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20131202
20131210
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
his long captainity, mr. mandela left prison with his mind closed to any settling of scores and his heart open to those he had fought against. >> mandela in his fight for equality influenced not just world leaders, but also the people of the world. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to leave notes. one of them read, thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed s
courage changed the world. mr. mandela went from freedom fighter to political prisoner to president. >> his message of reconciliat n reconciliation, not vengeance, inspired people everywhere after he negotiated a peaceful end to the brutal segregation of black south africans and forgiveness for what the white government had done, oppressed them and imprisoned him. today, the world is remembering ali con. >> nelson mandela. nelson mandela. ♪ >> in south africa, the grieving and mourning are mixed with songs and celebration. for the man affectionately known by his clan name madibmadiba. remembering the life and legacy of any son mandela. i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company. it is interesting how much of a celebration it has been. there is the mourning. there were tears tonight. today it's been singing and dancing, people celebrating the life. >> he seems to have an impact on just about everyone. people around the world are reacting. we are watching live pictures of him being celebrated in the streets of johannesburg. died in the suburbs of johannesb
. i was the wife of a south african freedom fighter, belonged to a rival organization than mr. mandela's. my husband was a pat, pan african congress, mr. mandela was founder of anc, african national congress, others south african national union. i was used to those men and a few women shouting and screaming at each other. they were really arch rivals. when mr. mandela came, he didn't raise his voice. he didn't argue with anybody. he didn't put anybody down. they were rivals. i had never met a south african who wasn't shouting and really angry all the time. i know he was angry, but he didn't use his energy foolishly. so it was a year after that he was imprisoned. i became friends with his wife then, winnie mandela. and we continued to support each other over the years and over the oceans. and she would tell me how he was. he wasn't vitt uperative with t guards. i was part of hillary clinton's delegates when he was inaugurated. i sat there and watched the guards, who had guarded him for 27 years, sitting in the right sights, in the best seats, invited by mr. mandela. not to say look how
, he has a very close relationship with nelson mand a mandela. their lives are intertwined. mr. obama has said that his first political act as an individual was in support oh of the anti apartheid movement, which mr. mandela, of course, was leading. so there's that. we expect that this could be one of the largest gatherings of heads of states ever together assembled in one place. it's an event that will perhaps rival the funeral of pope john paul ii back in 2005. some 3 million converged upon the vatican. the numbers here at the football stadium where the main event will be held could be as many as 100,000 or so. there are several other venues in the johannesburg area where people will watch on giant televisions. and countless others will cram the streets to get near this area where there will be this huge event going on. and don't forget, after tomorrow, there are still three days of official mourning, where mandela's body will lie in state at the union buildings at the capital. and a final state funeral in qunu where mr. mandela was born and grew up. a week-long series of events, fu
, president reagan and u.s. policy was pro-white south africa and really, mr. mandela was on the terrorist list until july 1st, 2008, taken off by president george bush. until 2008 he was still on the terrorist list. >> he said some things that were very controversial. in 2002, mandela said as the debate about the war in iraq was beginning but before the war had launched, he said quote, if there's a country that has committed unspeakable atrocities in the world it is the united states of america. they don't care for human beings. now, obviously, there are lots of areas of american foreign policy that are ripe for criticism but to say the united states does not care about human beings does not seem to be a fair statement. how do you reconcile things like that that he said with the magnificence of his accomplishments and his forgiveness and everything great that he did? >> you know, we should be very humble in our approach about this, jake. 246 years legal slavery, 100 years of legal jim crow in our country, apartheid laws in this country gave rise to apartheid laws in south africa in 1948.
for the memorial service. some other world leaders who plan to attend for mr. mandela are the u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon, david cameron, prince charles is going. the french president, francois hollande and even the cuban president, as we said he had ties with cuba in the past, raul castro, list goes on and on of dignitaries. >> of course, with president obama and three of his predecessors going to south africa, you can imagine what robin was talking about, and that is security and the kind of complex situation they're dealing with potentially a nightmare. secret service had very little time to prepare for the trip. athena jones is joining us at the white house. we're very much aware of what it takes. there's not a lot of advance work when you have the limited amount of time. air force one expected to touch down what, early tomorrow morning? >> early tomorrow morning. i think about 1:00 a.m., they'll be making a fuel stop on the way. bottom line, these are the kinds of trips that take weeks and months to prepare. this was compressed into a very short time line. the spokesman for the s
peacefully last night surrounded by his family. mr. mandela, became a symbol of hope around. world for his life long struggle against the apartheid system of racial segregation in his country. he spent 27 years in prison for defying that system. after his release he sought not revenge but reconciliation. mr. mandela went on to push for one of the most progressive constitutions on planet and became south africa's first democrat exly elected black president. he chronicled end of apartheid and mandela's election and serving as african correspondent for the bbc. tom, thanks for joining us today with your thoughts. and what were they when you first got the news that mandela pass ad way? >> i had a lot of emotions both at a personal level and a professional one. i had the same feelings that everyone had, this was absolute titan of the global stage whose like we'll probably never see in our lifetimes again. these sort of men only only come around everyone hundred years or some i have memories when i met him during the time i was in south africa, particularly of his personal warmth and humor. i re
in a gathering with mr. mandela. i'll never forget, he said you cannot be afraid to grow and evolve. you have got to be willing to continue to grow, if you're going to be effective, and he grew. you've got to remember there were a lot of nationalist groups that said he had turned soft, sold out. there were a lot of different tensions there. he was able to withstand the hatred and opposition of the african, a whites and he was focused on democracy. >> he was incredibly tenacious in that he had the question of black nationalism versus the question of integration. eugene, you have a great piece and i'll read an exert of it today. we should remember not only the man who embraced his former enemies but also the man who refused to be bowed by those enemies, who remained militant despite 27 years of imprisonment who walked out of jail with his head held high and eyes toward the future. >> we think of nelson mandela and see that smile that's like sunshine. it just lights up anyplace. i only had the experience of meeting him once, it was in '94 and he was already nelson mandela. but before, long before, i
the generation of prisoners who were there with mr. mandela would simply not see a free south africa. and those who were in our 20s at the time, i thought by the time change came in south africa, we would be pretty old and not make a contribution to a democratic south africa. i thought it would be extremely bloody and conflict ridden. and we would inherit a country that would take time to heal and rebuild and just get people together again. i was convinced that it was never going to happen in -- in -- so soon. even by '85 i didn't think it would happen in the lifetime of many, many people who have played a good and leading role in building a democratic south africa. >> and nelson mandela was freed from prison in 1990 as inaugurated as president of south africa in 1994. thank you so much for joining us and reflecting on this important day. our deepest on dole lances to you and everyone in south africa on this huge, huge loss. he went on to become the ceo of the nelson mandela foundation, by the way. >>> joining us later today, i'll be edit sitting down and speaking with former president bill cli
one of its great moral leaders. >> despite his long years of captivity, mr. mandela left prison with his mind closed to any settling of scores and his heart open to those he had fought against. >> mandela in his fight for equality influenced not just world leaders, but also the people of the world. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to stop to pay their respects. some shedding tears. one note read, quote. thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard around the world. michaela? >> thank you, erin. so many felt he was fighting for their freedom as well. freedom from poverty, oppression, whatever. >> i met some kids in south africa that said he is like the madiba. they feel like someone they have a personal connection with and vital to them. >> he was known for visiting dignitaries, he would go around and greet the workers first to shake sure he spent time with them fir
president, almost from his arrival, he assumed a kind of command the first time his lawyer visz ited him, mr. mandela greeted them and to their amaizment as my code of honor. the authorities began treating him as a prison elder statesman. >> you have to understand, nelson mandela grew up in a house of royalty, the king in his village or in the village next to his was where he grew up. so he had a royal bearing. and i think he commanded respect. and he knew that. he didn't throw it around but he used it when it was important. so i think that, you know, during his time in prison, he did in fact begin to -- even though he may not have realized that he would ever get out of prison, but he took the steps that were necessary both with his comrades and the younger ones and older ones to be in a position to rule if that time ever came. i think this was the faith that eventually they would succeed that kept them all going. >> i want to hear you talk about the reaction you're seeing coming out of south africa to his passing. is the sense of mourning and sense of south africa losing its father figure a
of dignity for the african decent. his long walk to freedom, mr. mandela's constant fight for equality personified what my father often said injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. we showed briefly a second ago in new york city the apollo theatre marquis honors mandela. mayor bookberg announced he'll open a high school in honor of mandela. how much impact do you think mandela's life and times have on the civil rights movement and certainly during '80s and '90s when advocates demanded sanctions against apartheid in south africa. >> how much did it have? >> how much did it raise the credibility? >> tremendously. the fact the united states came on board. fortunately the united states came on board. it might have been a little late some would say. if you looked at other country they had come on board much earlier. what the united states did, students and universities started to say we want to divest our holdings in south africa. that was huge. when you impact a nation economically, then the community has to pay attention. business had to pay attention and say maybe these pol
want to show you the marquee back in 1990 when nelson mandela visited here. it says, mr. and mrs. a&m, welcome home. we love you. we love you. we love you. over the course of that visit to new york city, 750 people throughout the city saw him and of course, chris, you might remember that. mario cuomo was the governor, dinkins was the mayor and nelson mandela made a big splash here and big impression on new york when he visited here. >> i remember many said they never met anyone like nelson mandela. we'll check back in with you later on. >>> right now we get perspect e perspective, though, nelson mandela devoted himself to humanitarian work. sir richard branson worked with nelson mandela on many projects and helped him form a group called the elders. a very important part for nelson mandela to what should be his legacy. sir richard branson joins us now. thanks for joining us. great to have you on the show. i want to say first, nelson mandela was a personal friend as well as a role model and i am sorry for your loss this morning. but thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much.
of them -- not just -- i mean, in one sense, dad, because he was killed early, became an iconic figure. mr. mandela, over time, after he came out of jail, became iconic and once he became the president of the country. >> and he was particularly meaningful in your family. i think in your mom's kitchen -- >> yeah. >> -- there are family pictures, or there had been family pictures and the one non-family member of a photograph in that kitchen was nelson mandela. >> yes, it was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us
, president obama will be among the mourners along with mrs. obama who met mandela shortly after becoming first lady. president bush and laura bush have been invited to travel with the obamas, and former president clinton and hillary clinton will travel to the tribute for nelson mandela. from south africa we hear from one of his friends who described those final visits with the man he revered. abc's byron pitts from outside mandela's home. >> reporter: nowhere has admiration for nelson mandela been stronger, expressed more passionately than a few feet from his doorstep outside his home where the beloved statesman took his last breath. >> by singing and dancing, it's a way of showing our appreciation. >> he represents this country. >> reporter: nelson mandela will be laid to rest in grand style. tuesday, a memorial service like the world has never seen. some 95,000 people packed inside the stadium. wednesday through friday the former president will lay in state in pretoria, the nation's legislative capital. next sunday mandela will be laid to rest in the small village of his boyhood on the
interviewer. he said, mr. mandela, about the communists, and madiba said, well, they were the only ones that helped had us, next question. >> interesting. >> and moved right ahead. >> you afforded him a ticker tape parade down the canyon of heroes, which was reserved for very few. that's like amelia earhart, john glen, jesse owens. that was extraordinary. did he understand the significance of that? did he get it? >> oh, yes. he was a very wise man, and he understood the significance. later when we had a gathering at yankees sta yankees stadium, it must have been 60,000, 70,000 people. i put the yankee jacket around his shoulders and the cap, and he looked out at the crowd and said, now you know who i am. i am a yankee. and that went around the world. george steinbrenner was so impressed he said, i'll pay for it. >> you know that was impressive he was going to put out for that. how about the reception in harlem? what was that like? >> it was amazing. he spoke at 125th and lenox avenue, the site from which people like malcolm x and martin luther king and many had spoken earlier. here's th
want. natalie? >> absolutely. go get yourself a hot chocolate, dylan. thank you. >>> president and mrs. obama are traveling to south africa today to attend tuesday's public memorial service for nelson mandela. the anti-apartheid icon died thursday at the age of 95. former president george w. bush and his wife were invited to join the obamas aboard air force one. president obama's expected to speak at the service which is being held at a 90,000-seat sports stadium in johannesburg. >>> some of the nation's top reformers of all time were honored last night in washington. piano man billy joel, opera star martina arroyo, herbie hancock, shirley maclaine and carlos santana received kennedy center honors. the president was among those paying tribute. >>> prince harry's trek to the south pole with the teams of wounded service members including one from the u.s. is no longer a race. nbc's ayman mohyeldin tells us why it's been turned into an exercise of survival and cooperation. >> reporter: it began as a race to the south pole. wounded soldiers, hollywood actors and a prince. three teams all r
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)